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Mushroom Season (so far) at Isle of Eriska Hotel!

  
  
  

Mushrooms at Eriska

Recently mushrooms have been popping up everywhere at Isle of Eriska! Although the pictures are not of edible mushrooms, I thought I would share them with you as well as giving you some fun facts and guidelines! 

Scotland's Fungi

Fungi or mushrooms have been around for millions of years and are not plants or animals so have a kingdom of their own! Fungi come in all shapes, sizes and colours (and smells!) and can be found all over the world throughout the year living on wood, roots, soil, leaves and many more places. Scotland's woodland, grassland, mountains and coasts provide special habitats for over 12,000 species. Scotland is internationally important for the brightly coloured waxcap species which live on undisturbed grassland. Scottish woodland provide homes for fungi protected by UK biodiversity action plans, including the Hazel Glove Fungus and a group of tooth fungi, while some species of puffball have only been recorded in Scotland. More information on Scottish Fungi can be found here 

Mushrooms at Isle of EriskaAs well as collecting fungi to eat, many species can only be named by detailed inspection, supplemented by microscopic examination. Collecting is thus essential for identification. The first step is to determine the spore colour by placing the mushroom on paper or glass and waiting a few hours. Beautiful shapes are formed as the ‘rain’ of spores reflects the patterns of the gills or pores. As the spores accumulate, their colour can be seen.

 

Tree Fungi at Isle of EriskaMushroom Season

Most naturalists begin foraying with the main flush of fruit bodies in August and carry on until mid-October. Several fungi continue to fruit into November or even December, unaffected by frost, and possibly have a second fruiting. Fungi growing on wood may be at their best in winter, even when there have been flurries of snow. Many fungi start fruiting before August, e.g. May for chanterelles in the Borders. Other species are found only in the spring, e.g. lorel. If one really wishes to get to know more fungi, collecting all year round is necessary. The Scottish Wild Mushroom Code can be found here. 

 

Ten things you didn't know about mushrooms

  1. The ancient Egyptians saw mushrooms as a plant of immortality and a food that was only fit for Royalty
  2. Roman soldiers ate them before going into battle because they believed mushrooms would increase their strength
  3. A portabella mushroom usually contains more potassium than a banana
  4. The ancient Greeks believed that mushrooms had magical healing powers
  5. Mushrooms are 90% water
  6. They were first cultivated commercially in France in the late 19th century
  7. Some scientists believe that mushrooms spores, which are made of chitin, the hardest naturally-made substance on Earth, could be capable of space travel
  8. The largest living organism found was a honey mushroom, which covered 3.4 square miles of land in the Blue Mountains in eastern Oregon
  9. People in mid 15th century Europe believed mushrooms were grown by evil spirits
  10. The fairy rings at Stonehenge are some of the world’s oldest living mushroom colonies and can be seen from the air.

Mushrooms on the menu - Choosing the right wine

Mushrooms don't have a singular flavour profile. They range from the mildest of button mushrooms to flavoursome porcini. Each which suggests a different wine pairing, from lighter-bodied and more delicate for the former to fuller-bodied and more powerful for the latter. The following might help you make the right choice when dining;

Earthy mushrooms, such as black trumpets, chanterelles and shiitakes go best with earthy reds such as Burgundy, nebbiolo and pinot noir.

Meaty mushrooms, such as morels, cremini, porchini and portobello's go better with meaty wines such as pinot noir (sometimes), syrah/shiraz and sagniovese. 

We asked our somelier to recommend some of our wines to go with mushrooms. We chose to give you a value for money option and 'the special treat' option, and we came up with the following; 

For the light and more delicate flavours, a Burgundy, a more matuderd and aged wine;

1. ALOXE-CORTON “LES CHAILLOTS”1er CRU  Domaine Louis Latour 2005 (£50.00)

2. CHÂTEAU CORTON GRANCEY Domaine Louis Latour 2002 (£90.00)

For the more meaty mushrooms, a Barolo,  the older the better;

1. BAROLO PIEMONTE Massolino, Piemonte 2008 (£120.00)

2. BARBARESCO Gaja Piemonte 2007 (£140.00)

Barolo is one of the most complex, aromatic and delicious red wines in the world, and they are something different, you would be treating yourself buying both these bottles! 

Somelier's dream wine; 

CHAPELLE CHAMBERTIN GRAND CRU Domaine Trapet 2000 - a wine to come in very small batches, in other words not the everyday wine, and a bottle to be enjoyed! 

P.S. when you encounter milder mushrooms in butter or cream sauces, a full-bodied white can be the way to go!

Eriska's entire wine list offers outstanding value for money to diners, particularly when you compare our wine pricing with other top restaurants. Our comprehensive wine list runs to 40 pages and provides extensive options both geographically and in terms of price. You can click on the button below check availability in the restaurant or on the Eriska Wine Weekend to experience a matched wine and dine event with our Head Chef Ross Stovold and Master of Wine, Mark O'Bryen in November!

  

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