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Cool Private Island Resorts

  
  
  

Often you do not appreciate what you have until someone points it out!

Last week i received a wonderful surprise when a parcel arrived by courier. Nowadays with the wonderful royal mail we seem to have continual deliveries of boxes and parcels and since the birth of Amazon - it seems to give people of Eriska a lifeline to the real world- strange when Oban and the touch shops are only 12 miles away but I suppose this is a sign of the times and a perfect example of the computer age- its easier and probably more cost effective to sit on your couch at home and order items than to get ina car and travel and converse with a shop attendant just down the road.

Anyway the courier left and I was confronted by a carborrd box which intrigued me- what had someone seen as being so important to send a van from Glasgow to deliver. So I opened it with caution and was delighted to see a copy of a new hardback book entitled

"The World's 101 Best Islands" 

paradise island resized 600As one would expect it had a wonderful paradise island on the front cover and an excellent foreword written by Farhad Vladi, in which he explains the mystery surrounding islands and the magnetic draw which has made him photograph and track private islands for the last 40 years- and indeed it is the same draw which made me keep turning the pages to see the next wonderful spot myself .

island of Eriska

 

So it was probably no surprise that one hour later and 96 islands later I was still flicking through and ignoring my long list of jobs left for me. however the perseverance was worth it as I turned the page and came across a very familiar shot- one of Eriska! I had not anticipate this nor had I been aware, I had not thought of Eriska as one of the 101 Best Islands in the World but was clearly thrilled to be included.

In short we are an island, we are in a stunning part of the world and the location scenery and climate has its own charms and personality as individual and unique as Necker Island in the Caribbean or Heron Island in Australia. Sometimes we simply need to stop- look around- immerse ourselves in our environment and simply appreciate how lucky we are!

So it is great to be reminded by the book and I am sure it will become one of the most read books in the drawingroom and I wonder how many guests will get as far as page 184! 

West Coast Weather Forecast wc 3rd November

  
  
  

This week marks a stark change in the West Highalnd Seasons

 

Its often amazing how the climate seems to remain the same and then suddenly overnight we flip into a completely different season. So it has been this week as we started with a mild - if damp - Monday and this was soon followed by torrential rain- stories of 6 inches falling in 45 minutes do not seem implausible- and strong winds so that today when  we awaken - the leaves are off the trees, the temperature is almost 10 degrees lower and the mountains of Kingairloch and Ben Cruachan have white snow caps adorning them- winter is truly here!

Strangley it seems later than usual and this woudl not be a surprise as the summer seemed to continue longer than normal and this has pushed autumn into November. Rutting Stags resized 600The Deer Rut and stalking was certainly later and whilst I am hearing stories of a great month on the mountains with fantastic images of Rutting Stags it does play havoc with my plans for collecting leaves in October and we still have a lot of raking and burning to do now to get tideied up for Christmas

It is one of the stregnths of Scotland the ever changing weather and certainly one of te attractions compared with places that never seem to alter seasons- fortunately its one which we appreciate even if its also one we seem to continually complain about! So what is in store for this first week of winter!

Today: Bright with sunny spells and scattered showers today although be warned that the showers will be fierce!

Monday: Bright with sunny spells, but also scattered showers, mainly over higher ground at first, but developing further east during the afternoon, perhaps the odd heavy one later over Eriska. Fresh or strong west to northwesterly winds slowly easing.

Tuesday: Showers will become more isolated and confined to coastal areas , with long clear spells inland, leading to fairly widespread frost over rural parts as the winds fall light. 

Wednesday: A few showers continuing , otherwise a dry and bright day with lengthy spells of sunshine for most parts. Light west to northwesterly winds. 

Thursday: Rain clearing to showers  then bright with sunny spells and showers in the evening.

Friday:After a dry night some heavy and prolonged periods of rain. Windy, risk of gales 

Saturday:Rain will soon clear leaving clearer but showery weather for most of the weekend. It is likely to stay largely unsettled thereafter with showers or longer spells of rain, locally heavy.

40 years memories in a box!

  
  
  

Throwing out items can bring back memories!

Finally after a couple of weeks of staring at a pile of a box of papers in our office I decided to do the task I have been putting off. many years ago- before we arrived the office at Eriska the area to the left of the front door - like many houses - was the washroom- it is now- refurbished and holds the offices and reception of the house.  Above our office is an old store where there used to be a water tank, it has been disused for many years and is now a store for old paperwork and documents of importance to the Inland Revenue but , I thought, of little interest to anyone else. Anyway as it is in part of the old house it is an a fairly high ceilinged room but as it used to be the old water closet for the house it is also quite constrained so requires time and patience in getting a ladder in position and help in transporting any materials in either direction.

Anyway yesterday seemed to be quiet and there was a lull in activity - that combined with a great deal of furniture movement due to one of the rooms in the main house being refurbished that I decided to utilise the added hands and move the document pile into its new home and at the same time clear out some of the older material from above the office.

 All a really simple task if only it was that simple!

Whilst the store is dry and warm it is also dusty and cramp so once I had squeezed into the space movement remained constricted and I had to double move some of the boxes just to create enough room operate. Then I realized that moving the boxes out of the space may or already had become even more of a challenge than initially thought so we set up a stream to pass simply the paper work down and then replace it with the new documents  leaving the original boxes in place. After a strenuous 30 minutes all seemed to be complete until I came across a treasure trove of a box near the bottom.

My eye was first caught by a wages book dating back to 1980 and a quick flick though showed some names I recognized and clearly some I had no recollection of - however interestingly 34 years has seen the top hotel salary increase by 10 times and the bottom salary increase only by 7 times- maybe a sign of the times. I then came across some menus from back in the seventies and whilst some of the dishes are similar there is certainly a few dated elements- fruit cup and mushroom paste are probably not dishes we would serve today but it certainly raised a wry smile from Ross when he was chatting with my Mum about the old times- still porridge and Oatcakes remain timeless!

Then I came across the quote for the tennis court - £5000 in 1980 seemed a bargain but more impressively was all the documentation regarding planning permission to erect a 2.2m fence around the court to form a ball enclosure- one my father was arguing was a deer fence despite it having a 5m gap in one side to let spectators watch the game! A battle he won although the tome of paperwork and letters may not have seemed worthwhile to most it must have been a moral victory to my father.

Even his drawing of the fence in triplicate to scale - using copier carbon paper -was slightly ironic and appeared to have caused the planners final straw to let them accept his plans. In reality achieving planning permission for a 12m high shed to cover the court two years ago seems to have been easier than his initial battle.

Finally we have come across all the quotations for the work on converting Eriska back in 1973. In reality these documents will have little interest to others but have a small place in our heart and I will now have to reduce  down the box for common sense but will keep the heart just in case. 40 years of memories will fill more than a box  but maybe all that was discovered and unearthed yesterday will be the catalyst for more! We are still appealing for any memories or images of guests stays at Eriska over the last 4 decades and would welcome any more. 

West Coast Weather w/c 27th October

  
  
  

With most of the leaves now off the trees and the wind starting to bring in colder breezes its not hard to believe that winter is just around the corner. However the change of clocks last night at least makes the mornings seem easier even if the down side is that the evenings will start closing in and definately - for us - that will mean that the curtains will be closed even earlier but thats even more of an excuse to snuggle down beside a log fire with a nice book and kind malt to enjoy!

In reality we can look back at tis autumn having been quite kind with a late fall of leaves and then some stronger winds to help them off the trees and make the teams job easier to clear them up and prepare for winter. When I checked my mothers sun machine for the last month it showed that many days had as much sunshine as peak summer and even though it was cooler it was at least dry and bright. 

So whats ahead for next week:

Today: Rain at first but soon dying out to clear skies and light winds. Winds then freshen with blustery showers spreading from west, 

Monday: Frequent showers, turning squally with heavy rain, or hail and thunder. South becoming southwest winds will reach gale force in showers with surface water and spray making travel difficult.

Tuesday: Bright at first but showers developing, turning cooler and breezier

Wednesday: Fairly repetitive but more persistent rain due in through the afternoon.

Thursday:The end of the week looks unsettled with showers or longer spells of rain, and generally windy so Thursday provides a lull before the storm!

Friday: Probably strong winds possibly gale force and potentially a very wet and windy day.

Saturday: Not much better but the wind will begin to die down later in the day and lead to a period of calm.

 

Taittinger Winter Wine Weekend

  
  
  

The essence of life is learning through enjoyment.

No place is this more prevalent than in our pursuit of further knowlege in the fields of wines and food - so what better way  to combine these two fascinating topics than by arranging a weekend of education her at Eriska. Or so we though back in 1993 when we first organised a Winter Wine Weekend. Back in those days we all had so much more time - and it could be argued a far greater thirst for knowledge that we used to run a three day weekend. Guests arrived on the Thursday in preparation for a full day in the kitchen. On the Friday our kitchen team would be joined by experts in their field to help explain and educate. One that sprung to mind was a Seafood and Chardonnay weekend when Andy Race- our fish merchant arrived- late on Thursday because in those days the market on Thursday night physically took place in Mallaig and he had to be there in person to examine, bid and purchase the fish.

On the Friday monring he simply brought in a huge box of mixed fish and with 20 guests sitting round, dressed in aprons and armed with knives he tallked through the box demonstrated how to identify, pick and select the best fish ( a lesson I still utilise) and how to prpeare it for the the kicthen with ease. This, as then, followed by working demonstrations and then the kitchen team took his work and helped show how it could be transformed. All sounded so simple but by the end of the day we had a great lunch and had some wonderful produce ready for dinner.

Then we are joined by some partners who could not escape for all three days and had a wonderful dinner focussing on the proiduce that had been prepared and with an introduction to winechardonnay resized 600s of the world all featuring the Chardonnay Grape.

On Saturday we had anther practical; day with a demonstartion and talk from Inverawe Smokehouse highlighting the skill involved in curing and smoking fish- a skill we then took even further when we opened our own smoker- and then after lunch it was out on the water- some went out with a prawn creeler, some went to a local Oyster Hatchery and farm and some simply wantered on the beach as part of a guided foraging tour.prawn fishing resized 600

 

This was all simply to build up an appetite for dinner which was proceeded by a tasting of Chardonnay wines from around the world highlighting the huge range of grapes and abilities to create a diverse yet wonderful product. Then for dinner, the kitchen having been slightly freer and less invaded by fishmongers and guests- created a wonderful gastronomic dinner which was matched by a variety of wines which complemented the palate.

A greta fun weeknd and everybody learnt something- some more than others but all had left their cares of the world behind and ultimately relaxed.

However those days have slightly slipped away.

Time has become even more valuable but our thirst for knowledge has not waned so we are delighted to be able to announce that we will be joined by Mark O'Bryen, Master of Wine and Taittinger Ambassador to the Uk for our Winter Wine weekend which takes place over the weekend of the 16th November. In order to offer complete flexibility we have restricted the main event to a Champagne Masterclass on the Saturday Afternoon - for those not intersted in the rugby internationals!- and havearranged a tutored tasting to accompany Rosses wonderful dinner. It will allow Mark to Showcase the rangeform tis great champagne house and really introduce it to novices whilst evolving experts palates to appreciate the finer details. Clearly it will give teh opportunity to showcse the range but I am certain that we wil eb able to slip in a glass of still wine to help tittivate the taste buds styill further.  

Wache welcomes Cassie and the Millers to unveil plaque at Eriska

  
  
  

Wache 152

Earlier this year we launched our 'name the otter contest' and last week we welcomed Mr & Mrs Miller and Cassie to unveil the plaque underneath our friend on the rock. You may remember we set out to name the bronze otter sitting on the rock at Otter Point at Eriska, in conjunction with our 40th anniversary as a Hotel. You may remember we announced the winner, Jo Thompson? if not here's a quick recap!

DSC 7017  OTTER AT HIGH TIDE  SMALLThe Bronze Sculpture

Wache was made by bronze sculptor Kenneth Robertson, using advanced techniques, initially creating a wire meshed mould which was then cast as a simple albino plaster. Ensuring he fitted in to the environment and more importantly onto a rock at Otter Point was essential and it was moulded to fit a particular rock looking a specific way to guard the island. This took several visits and much hard work from Kenneth and his son. 

Dr. Jo Thompson & 'Name the Otter Contest'

describe the imageWe felt our sculpture needed a name and so we set out to get our friend a name earlier in the summer. After a few weeks of collecting name suggestions and votes, a name was announced; Wache was sent in by Dr. Jo Myers Thompson, and is old Scottish for 'Eternal Watcher'. 

Dr. Jo Myers Thompson is the Executive Director of the Lukuru Wildlife Research Foundation, a not-for-profit umbrella organisation overseeing a variety of conservation efforts in the deep heart of equatorial Africa. By profession, she is a primatologist and naturalist.  

Jo received her doctorate degree from the University of Oxford, United Kingdom, and is a contributing author to several books about ecology, distribution and evolution. Since 1995 Jo has been involved with otter conservation, which started with her raising an infant Congo Clawless Otter. At that time, the species had recently been declared extinct. However, that classification was based on absence of reports not absence of the otters.  So, she was launched into the world of otter conservation as the world expert on the Congo Clawless Otter species. Through her work she also met Victoria Miller from Oban, which is how Jo found out about our little contest!

 

PLAQUE

As we mentioned above we received Mr & Mrs Miller and Cassie last week to unveil the plaque we got made for Wache this summer. They have had Basenjis for years, and on the top picture you see them with their Basenji, Cassie - the whole reason Jo found out about our otter contest! Unfortunately Jo could not come with us to unveil the plaque being attached to the rock so they brought Cassie instead!  

The First Meeting

Victoria met Jo through and online forum and a mutual friend.  They met for the first time in person when Jo was speaking at the Hope4Apes conference in London 2010, hosted by Sir David Attenborough. Helena Lane (fellow breeder) and Victoria travelled to London to meet with Jo Thompson to discuss the possibility of importing one of Jo’s Lukuru Basenji puppies. The following year (September 2011), Cassie was imported into the UK - the first Congolese Native Basenji since the early foundation stock. Although born in the USA, Cassie was bred from pure Native stock brought back by Jo from a conservation area in the Democratic Republic of Congo where there are no other dogs except the Native Basenjis. Cassie is the first truly African Basenji to arrive in the UK for 70 years!

"Cassie had 7 pups this summer, 31st July, which is why the visit has had to wait! Cassie and the pups are healthy and enjoy life off the west coast of Scotland", Victoria assures me. "Cassie's parents are on the other side of the planet, living the 'American Dream' with Jo". All this talk about Basenjis, you have to start wondering about the breed itself.

Benkura BasenjiThe Basenji

The size of a Fox Terrier, the Basenji has a wrinkled brow, prick ears, pliant skin, short tight curled tail, very short coat and wash themselves like a cat. They are a hunting dog capable of very high speeds who point and flush game, but their most unique features are they are barkless and carry no dog odours, a most useful asset when they are in pursuit of game who do not easily pick up their scent. Discovered in the African Congo with Pygmy hunters, early explorers called the dogs after the tribes that owned them or the area in which they were found, such as Zande dogs or Congo terriers. The native tribes used the dogs (which often wore large bells around their necks) as pack hunters, driving game into nets.

Early attempts to bring Basenjis to England in the late 1800s and early 1900s were unsuccessful because the dogs all succumbed to distemper. In the 1930s, a few dogs were successfully brought back to England and became the foundation (along with subsequent imports from the Congo and Sudan) of the breed outside of Africa. The name Basenji, or "bush thing," was chosen. The early imports attracted much attention, and soon after the Basenji was brought to America. The breed's popularity as both a pet and show dog grew modestly but steadily. In the 1950s, a surge of popularity occurred as a result of a book and movie featuring a Basenji!

Wache 129All this talk about Basenjis, what is your relationship to the otter side of things?

"As you can see I took my otter t-shirt out for the occasion! No really, my relationship with otters is mainly through Jo, however living in the West Coast of Scotland, you can’t help but have an affinity with the local wildlife and otters are a truly special creature.”

We can't say anything else than that we agree with you! At Eriska the is an abundance of wildlife, such as red deer, badgers, birds and otters (!) in such tranquille surroundings - what is there not to love!

We want to thank you both for coming to see the plaque unveiled and of course for bringing Cassie along!

If you are looking to cure the 'winter' blues why not check out our 3 night rates this month, visit Wache, have some heavenly delicious food in our restaurant and a soak in the Jacuzzi in the Stables Spa. 

October Rates

West Coast Weather - Week Commencing 13th October

  
  
  

West Coast Weather - Isle of Eriska

Last week we were pleasantly surprised with dry and sunny, yet cold weather on the west coast. The weather gave us with the camera at hand many opportunities to catch the 'unreliable' weather and the many unique forms and shapes it creates - to be fair my camera could not do the view above any justice! 

This week's West Coast Weather looks to continue the nice and dry days, with sunny spells and a continuing 'cold' breeze before a mildy wet weekend takes form on Friday. 

Today: it is dry with sunny spells today, however it may become slightly cloudier during the afternoon with brisk north easterly winds developing. Tonight looks to be mainly cloudy but the cloud will thin at times to give a few clear interludes, otherwise a chilly evening. 

Monday: looks to be mostly dry but rather cloudy with chance of sunshine across Argyll and the Isles.  

Tuesday: is projected to be dry with sunny intervals.

Wednesday: looks to be dry at first but may becoming wet and windy later in the evening

Thursday: is projected to become drier again and slightly brighter

Friday: with easterly winds Friday looks to set the scene for the weekend with patches of rain and cloudy intervals. 

Saturday: looks to continue Friday's patches of clouds and rain, yet with sunny spells throughout the day. 

West Coast Weather EriskaA sunny start coming to work this morning. Although a bit chilly, nothing beats walking out in the cold sunshine with the right clothes! Bring your autumn jacket, your base layer and a little scarf to Eriska and you are sorted for walking across the island taking pictures of the beautiful and scenic landscape the west coast of Scotland has to offer! Click the button below for more walks! 

West Coast Walks \u0026amp\u003B Hikes  

 

World Porridge Day at Isle of Eriska - 10th October 2013

  
  
  

 

 

World Porridge Day

Join us in the 'celebration' of Scotland’s traditional national dish! Today on the 10th October it is the World Porridge Day! We spoke to Ross in the kitchen about his relationship to the simple and nutritious cereal and the will look at the use of oats in the Scottish diet!

The History of Porridge Oats 

The humble oat has been a staple of the Scottish diet since medieval times. It is used to make porridge, of course, as well as such other traditional favourites as oatcakes, bannocks, skirlie, haggis, mealy pudding and for frying fish. Every croft once had its own girnel, an oatmeal barrel, as well as a porridge drawer.

A batch of porridge would be made at the beginning of the week and kept cold in the drawer so that members of the family could slice off chunks as they were needed, perhaps for a snack while working out on the fields.

Oats were always popular in Scotland as they are a hardy cereal, able to grow in harsh climates and poor soil. Scotch oats, also referred to as 'pinhead', are chopped rather than rolled into smaller pieces and therefore tend to be chewier and take longer to cook. The finer the oatmeal, the quicker it takes to prepare and the smoother the consistency.

The Porridge 


porridge 4In its simplest form, oats were eaten as brose with hot water, but porridge is more popular, though how it is made differs from household to household. The traditional Scots way is to soak the oats overnight, then boil them in the morning, stirring the mixture as it thickens with a wooden spirtle to avoid lumps!

Porridge purists may reject adding any modern-day luxuries such as 'heaven forbid, sugar, milk, syrup or cream ' instead sticking to the time-honoured tradition of oats, water and salt (which was also Ross' first introduction to the cereal - see below). Yet if you don't have the time or patience to stand lovingly over the hot stove while the porridge comes to the boil, then making it in the microwave offers an easier and much quicker alternative today. You simply just have to find your favourite amongst the many ways of cooking and types of combinations, whether they are sweet or savoury! Even just as a cereal added to your yoghurt or smoothie makes your meal all that much more filling!

 

Health Benefits? 

World Porridge DayA bowl of hot porridge served on frosty mornings with a little milk is by all accounts extremely good for you. Oats contain more fibre than many other cereal grains and they are a good source of essential fatty acids and vitamins. Furthermore, it staves off hunger for longer as the carbohydrates in oats are absorbed by the body slowly. According to the NHS, findings support existing evidence that whole grains in the diet are important for cardiovascular health. They are recommended as part of a healthy, balanced diet and, along with recommended levels of physical activity, may help to prevent cardiovascular disease.

 

Ross StovoldRoss' first introduction to porridge & his use of the hardy cereal

 "My earliest memory of porridge is of my granddads serving us it cooked in water with a healthy pinch of salt! It wasn't pleasant, but the trick was to eat it as quickly as possible to avoid it setting in the bowl, which made it very child unfriendly!

I have grown to really appreciate oats and their many uses, my preferred method for porridge is to soak the oats in milk overnight (about 3 x milk to oats), then cook the porridge with this milk in the morning. Cook it slowly over low heat, stirring occasionally - this will yield a creamy finish to your breakfast.

It lends itself to savoury dishes as well! Try braising some oxtail and adding some of the stock after the meats cooked to some toasted oats - you won't need much stock. Stir in some diced butter from the fridge, some chopped chives and cooked chopped smoked bacon. Serve it underneath the oxtail for a change to mashed potato. You'll be surprised how good it is!"

 

Do you have any recipes for porridge you want to share? Why not put your favourite combination in a comment below? Or even better, if you are coming to stay with us in November, try out our own Eriska porridge! There is definitely something about spending a cold autumn morning in the luxurious country house style hotel with a bowl of porridge surrounded by the crisp colourful autumn forest, relaxing views over the gardens or by the roaring log fire...

West Coast Weather - Week Commencing 6th October

  
  
  

WCW 6th October

Last week's West Coast Weather was surprisingly sunny and offered many of us an opportunity to spend our afternoons and early evenings outside without a worry. Other evenings again almost looked a bit threatening - like the picture above - but nothing! It was staying humid and mild throughout the week before the colder wind caught up with us at Eriska at the beginning of the weekend! The coming week looks much the same with some patches of rain, cloudy and a few rays of sun with milder temperatures. 

Today: it is quite cloudy at first with a little rain, but it looks to be dying out, becoming brighter later this morning with some sunshine this afternoon, best across Lanarkshire. Breezy with fresh south-westerly winds. Tonight: Most places will be dry at first. Patchy light rain will edge in from northwest to most places later tonight, but becomes heavy over north Argyll. Otherwise mild and breezy. 

Monday: looks to be cloudy with further outbreaks of rain, heavy at times up towards Oban and Mull. Rain will be patchy elsewhere with drier, interludes, especially across Ayrshire and Lanarkshire. Fresh south-westerly winds. 

Tuesday: is projected to be mainly dry and bright

Wednesday: looks to be turning colder with sunny spells and blustery showers. Strong north-westerly winds.

Thursday: looks to be mainly dry with sunny spells and winds becoming lighter, but clouding over in the evening.

Friday: Thursday's weather seems to linger leaving another mainly dry day with a few rays of sun otherwise cloudy. 

Saturday: continues to stay dry, cloudy otherwise it looks to be a bit colder than earlier in the week. 

A West Coast New Year Celebration - Isle of Eriska Hotel

  
  
  

 

fireworks

Happy new year
Happy new year
May we all have a vision now and then
Of a world where every neighbour is a friend
Happy new year
Happy new year

I am sure many of you will sing this song in your head - Yes - Abba 1980

photo 3

Why do we celebrate New Year? What is so important with this temporal boundary? We had a look through some old (yes that old) pictures from our long tradition of festive celebrations here at Eriska this week and thought we would look a bit closer at the world wide celebration of New Year as it is a part of our loved festive season on the island! 

As we all know the celebration is quite different depending on where you are in the world just before midnight on the 31st December and you may have experienced very different celebrations in today's well travelled world. As much as 24% of the adult population in the UK plan to make the most of their Christmas and New Year periods by traveling elsewhere in the UK during the festive season! Nevertheless, for most people it has been and still is a time celebrated with family and friends - famously expressed through song by Abba and even more famously captured by Robert Burns' Auld Lang Syne. 

An Ancient Holiday & A Change in Calendar  

People have long celebrated New Year’s Day, New Year’s is in fact one of the oldest holidays still celebrated, but the exact date and nature of the festivities has changed over time. It originated thousands of years ago in ancient Babylon, celebrated as an eleven day festival on the first day of spring. Though its location on the calendar has moved around quite a bit throughout Western history. The Julian calendar considered 1st January the first day of the new year, but in Medieval Europe, dates with more religious significance (like Dec. 25, Mar. 25—the traditional date of the Annunciation—and Easter) were marked as New Year’s Day, until Europe gradually made the switch to the Gregorian calendar in the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries. Historically, people have always celebrated the arrival of the new year, though depending on their community’s conception of when days begin, they might begin the celebration at sundown or at sunrise instead of at midnight. In the 18th and 19thcenturies, Western Europeans and Americans began marking the midnight between Dec. 31 and 1st January by drinking, ringing bells, or shooting off canons or fireworks—but each community kept its own time, so one town’s midnight might not align with the neighboring town’s midnight. When standard time was adopted at the International Meridian Conference in 1884, midnight became the official dividing line between days worldwide. 

Bygones and Nostalgia in Scotland

Many customs and traditions (some more common than others), were found online and we thought we would share some of the Scottish ways with you. 

The idea of celebrating New Year today is mainly to stay up to see the old year out with a party and welcome the New Year in. Now customs and traditions may be very different even from one town to another. Hogmanay is the Scots word for the last day of the year and is synonymous with the celebration of the New Year in the Scottish manner and is historically known to last for days - In other words no-one celebrates the eve quite like the Scots. Nobody knows for sure where the word 'Hogmanay' came from, but it may have originated from Gaelic or from Norman-French. 

Many believe that as Christmas was virtually banned and not celebrated in Scotland for over 400 years from the end of the 17th century until the 1950’s, New Years Eve was therefore a good excuse for some revelry and the excuse to drink whisky and eat good food as everyone were working through the Christmas period. 

Auld Lang Syne

Another great tradition is the singing of Robert Burns' Auld Lang Syne (times gone by), a song about love and friendship in the times gone by, sharing a drink to sympbolise friendship. 

Auld Lang Syne

Should auld acquaintance be forgot, 
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And auld lang syne!
Chorus:
For auld lang syne, my jo,
For auld lang syne,
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet
For auld lang syne. 

  • Burns’ ‘Auld Lang Syne’ is sung to celebrate the start of the New Year at the stroke of midnight, not just in Scotland but in many English-speaking countries.

  • The Guinness Book of World Records lists ‘Auld Lang Syne’ as one of the most frequently sung songs in English. The song is sung or played in many movies, from ‘It's a Wonderful Life’ to ‘When Harry Met Sally.’

  • To sing ‘Auld Lang Syne’ a circle is created and hands are joined with the person on each side of you. At the beginning of the last verse, everyone crosses their arms across their breast, so that the right hand reaches out to the neighbour on the left and vice versa. When the tune ends, everyone rushes to the middle, while still holding hands.

The First Footing

First Footing is from the olden days where one was supposed to bring good luck to people for the coming year. As soon as the 1st of January arrived, people used to wait behind their doors for a dark haired person to arrive. This visitor would carry a piece of coal, a piece of bread, money and greenery. These items were all for good luck - coal for the house to stay warm, bread for everyone in the house to have enough food, money, well so that they would have enough money, and greenery to ensure a healthy long life.

The ‘first foot’ in the house after midnight is still very common is Scotland. To ensure good luck, a first footer should be a dark-haired male. Fair-haired first footers were not particularly welcome after the Viking invasions of ancient times. Much like before, traditional gifts include a lump of coal to lovingly place on the host’s fire, along with shortbread, a black bun and whisky to toast to a Happy New Year. To first foot a household empty-handed is considered grossly discourteous, never mind unlucky!

These traditions and customs are all told in slightly different ways by people and a range of versions are found on the internet. The main lesson during these celebrations is to welcome friends and strangers, with warm hospitality and of course a kiss to wish everyone a Good New Year! The underlying belief is to clear out the vestiges of the old year, have a clean break and welcome in a young, New Year on a happy note! We are sure you knew a lot of these fun 'facts' but 'how Scottish' are you? 

At Eriska we have an extensive programme for our New Year Package. Every year we offer a 5 night New Year Package, celebrating together with family and friends, in the good old country house style. 

New Year at Eriska

 


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